sybren van der velden

afstuderend performer 

Wie rendert?


Sybren van der Velde (The Hague, 2001) is a British- Dutch artist, currently studying at the Maastricht Institute of Performing Arts. Most of his

work is based around hypernostalgia, a concept that departs from the deeply sentimental longing for a space, place or moment, either in the past

or the future. He tends to magnify or even fetishize these feelings in day to day life, as well as in his art practice, constantly wondering if such

feelings are strictly confined to a personal experience, how distensible these feelings are, and if it's possible to long for a space, place, or time

which one hasn't lived through.

He believes that hypernostalgia can be prompted by anybody, anything, anywhere, and that is how, to him at least, it distinguishes itself from

regular nostalgia. Hypernostalgia doesn't deny or acknowledge the mostly linguistic restrictions that nostalgia might do, but covers and plays

around with a broader range of feelings.

Sybren tries to channel these feelings into landscapes, to cushion the homesick and the ones lost in time.

Wat rendert?


 ́Propovsky Hill is a dreary place, they say

With snifters crawling through the drainpipes in search of some gumdrop

Doxies and their flesh peddlers hiding in the garrets

Schoolboys waving around rapiers and switchblades

No place to raise a child, no place to grow old ́


A monologue about a psychotic cockney living in a Sovjet-sorta London and how he embarks on a raging swan hunt, fueled by funny powders and

the wordings in the paper. An ode to his culture, a dying culture, and its dialect, a dying dialect / an insight in the world of a young man growing

up, post-brexit, post-queen. We ́re all a bit cockney and we ́re definitely all a bit psychotic after all, aren ́t we? Oliver Cromwell, up yours!


Many thanks to my beloved cockney grandmother Violet Dorris Arms†, Paul Rondags, Kedves van den Berg, Jibbe Willems, Kim Boogaard,John Lydon, Kim Tsai and Mickey Davies.

Foto: Laura Dreyer 

Foto: Ies Kaczmarek